Appellate Counsel For California Trial Lawyers
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The Ray Jennings Case

In 2015, Jeff Ehrlich took on the habeas corpus case for an Iraq War veteran, Raymond Jennings, who had been convicted of murder and was serving a life sentence. Mr. Ehrlich’s son, Clinton, who was then a law student, became aware of the case by chance in May 2015. After looking into it more carefully he concluded that Mr. Jennings was innocent. Based on the analysis that Clinton developed, Mr. Ehrlich convinced the Los Angeles District Attorney’s Office to reopen Mr. Jennings’ case. The new investigation confirmed that Mr. Jennings was indeed innocent, and in January 2017, the court vacated Mr. Jennings’ conviction and found him to be “factually innocent.” Before his release Mr. Jennings spent 11 years in custody. His case and Mr. Ehrlich’s role in his exoneration have been the subject of extensive media coverage, including articles in the Los Angeles Times, and dedicated episodes of Dateline, Crimewatch Daily, and Breaking Homicide.

Raymond Lee Jennings Case Information and Documents

Letters to the Los Angeles District Attorney’s Conviction Review Unit (CRU)

Court Filings

News Stories

Appellate Passion: Jeffrey Ehrlich has helped set precedent, but he’s proudest of getting one man out of prison.
Los Angeles & San Francisco Daily Journal,
Monday, May 21, 2018

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